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EI Course Syllabus

Practice in Environmental Monitoring

Instructors: Mimi NAMEKI, Yoshika SEKINE, Yingjiu BAI, Yasushi KIYOKI, Wangling YAN
Content: workshop
Contact: mnameki (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline
Approach to environmental issues is based on science. It is absolutely necessary to understand and analyze environmental data scientifically in order to formulate a plan on environmental protection measures. In this course, students will be required to accurately understand the mechanism of environmental impact analysis, acquire the ability to analyze environmental data including ITC technology, and learn the scientific point of view and ideas on methods and measures of environmental data, through basic environmental measurements and experiments.

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Conceptual Framework (EG2)

Instructors: Tomoyuki FURUTANI, Naoto NAKAJIMA
Content: Lecture
Contact: maunz (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline
The aim of this class is to help students majoring in the Environmental Governance (EG) program to recognize problems and to create ideas as they undertake their master’s course research. We will examine the basic techniques necessary to carry out research projects, including methods for the review of existing research, undertaking field surveys, design simulation and academic writing. This course will also give students an overview of the academic potential of the field of environmental design. This class will require positive participation from students in group work, individual work, presentations and discussions. We will examine topics related not only to architecture and urban design, but also of planning and policy within urban, regional and social environments.

Good practices in urban planning and regional policy will be considered through the lenses of depopulation, falling birth rates, aging, low carbon society, environmental issues, as well as safety and security. Fieldwork in Fujisawa city or otherwise within Kanagawa prefecture is planned as is an overnight study trip.

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Conceptual Framework (Human Security)

Instructors: Michio UMEGAKI
Content: Lectures, Workshop, Group Work
Contact: umegaki (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline
Politics, society, economy or culture, everything we do or we live by is in transition. Nonetheless, we rarely examine, "analytically," 1) what constitutes a transition, 2) what it does to the individuals, communities or even nations, and much less 3) how the individuals or larger communities deal with it. The purpose of the seminar is to fill these void. We examine, through Marx to Parsons, Geerts to Robinson, the major analytical examinations of the transition. We also examine the students preparedness for embarking upon their own research WITH a better perspective of men in transition. We do this by allocating a section for Research Design, where the main role player is the students.

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PROJECT: Global Environmental System

Instructors: Hikaru KOBAYASHI, Mimi NAMEKI, Manabu OOMAE, Kazunori TANJI, Hironori HAMANAKA, Masataka WATANABE
Content: Lectures, workshop
Contact: hikaruko (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline
We welcome foreign students who wish to elaborate a policy or certain concrete activitity to improve the environment. This graduate school research project fourcuses on policymaking. This project covers international, national, local environmental problems, including climate change, watershed environment problems, and improved trafic control. In order to mitigate with these problems, students are encouraged to explore various policy instruments such as technological economic, and educational approches as well as the way to deploy them. Faculty members will support the students' researches by giving a wide variety of viewpoints.

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PROJECT: Geo-informatics of the Environment and Development

Instructors: Wangling YAN, Satoko OKI
Content: Lecture, Group Work
Contact: yan (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline
This project course aims to develop the methods and techniques of Geographic Information Systems and Science in order to solve problems related to the environment and development. Special attention is paid to using the technology to support planning and decision making in the context of mitigation and adaptation to climate change at urban and regional scales. Research within this course will cover a variety of topics, including data acquisition and interpretation with satellite images and ground observations; spatial modeling and simulation; theory and practice of adaptive urban and regional planning for sustainable development; resilience to climate change and disasters.

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PROJECT: Development Networks in Japan, Asia and North Pacific (JANP1)

Instructor: Michio UMEGAKI
Contact: umegaki (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline
Environmental degradation, public health risks, regional environment for policy coordination, local initiatives and alternatives for development, and others are the policy issues which fall into the purview of this seminar. However, we often neglect one obvious: the individuals who are at once the designers and beneficiaries of these policies. In this seminar, we examine the "individuals" as an analytical category -- from Max Weber to Edward Said, from Rostow to Amartya Sen. How tenacious an individual can be? How vulnerable an individual can be? These are some of the questions we need to answer. Each student's research design will be a close scrutiny of this perspective.

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PROJECT: Sustainable Development (JANP2)

Instructors: Lynn THIESMEYER, Setsuko AOKI, Toru NOMURA, Rudyanto BAMBANG
Content: Workshop, Group Work
Contact: thiesmey (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline: This is a graduate seminar designed to prepare Master's and PhD students for graduate research, field surveys, and thesis writing. The topic is Development in Southeast Asia and East Asia, with an emphasis on rural development.

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PROJECT: Environmental and Business Innovation

Instructors:Tomohiro ICHINOSE, Tomoyuki FURUTANI
Related Class:
Content: Workshop
Contact: maunz (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
At the 10th Biological Diversity Conference of Parties (COP10) held in October 2010 in Nagoya, Japan, COP adopted the “Nagoya Protocol”, an international regulation covering “Access to genetic resources and Benefit-Sharing” (ABS), as well as the “Aichi Target”, a new global target implemented in 2010. Both were the focal points at the conference. The United Nations Climate Change Conference in Cancun (COP16) in December 2010 closed without a concrete achievement. Environmental problems are becoming increasingly globalized, which unfolds conflicts of interests among several countries. Both domestic and overseas, interests of various stakeholders get complexly intertwined. In order to realize a sustainable development, we need to find a way to simultaneously fulfill environmental effect, economic benefit and social responsibility. This course aims to learn and practice Social Entrepreneurship from both environment and business perspectives. Focusing on domestic and international communities and cities, the course will try to discover “personal gain” through geographical information process, reference study and fieldworks. At the same time, it strives to design and practice environmental and business innovations on a platform where a diversified group of partners cooperate, which can also realize public gains.

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PROJECT: Platform and Business

Instructors: Yoshinori ISAGAI, Takahiro UEYAMA, Miki AKIYAMA, Jiro KOKURYO, Takeshi NATSUNO
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Note: Intended for the students who are interested in exploring specific strategies to solve problems in the business environment. Taking additional subjects by the faculty members above is strongly recommended.
Contact: isagai (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
Class Website: http://isagai.sfc.keio.ac.jp/

Outline:
Following the recent development of so-called networked societies there is increasing attention towards the use of “platform” as a keyword to resolve business and social problems. A platform is the basis for interactions among third parties and can be a target for design. This research project will explore specific ideas to design and build an effective platform by integrating experimental proofs, practice and theoretical studies
As an area of study, the class will cover issues relating to business models, regional renewal, community health, agriculture, information society, etc., regardless of whether they are profit-oriented or non-profit-oriented. Furthermore, words such as network, information, sociality & commerciality, innovation, etc. will be our common keywords. At our research meetings (to be usually held in the morning of every Monday), documents written with these keywords will be read in turns, in order to polish their contents through presentations of individual study themes and discussions.

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PROJECT: Urban Remodelling Design

Instructors: Hiroto KOBAYASHI, Naoto NAKAJIMA
Content: Workshop, Group Work
Contact: hiroto (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:

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PROJECT: Construction of Support Systems for Technical Development for Environmental Design

Instructors: Yasushi IKEDA, Shohei MATSUKAWA
Content: Workshop
Contact: yasushi (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
The chief purpose of this project is to explore a technical skill for practical and significant design in the field of architecture, landscape design, urban design and city planning. The project is around design applying various contemporary technologies such as ICT and developing synthetic social system to support this design. . This project id intended to promote a design to create new value in our future society and develop human resource that is able to achieve innovative environmental design.

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PROJECT: Novel Computing

Instructors: Yasushi KIYOKI, Shuichi KURABAYASHI
Content:
Contact: kiyoki (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
After entering the 21st century, the world finds itself faced with a number of acute problems that need to be revolved. In the field of science technology considerable changes are occurring in its values. At the same time, specialized research based on conventional disciplines are becoming ineffective. This project aims to pursue a new scientific method addressing an essential quality of science technology, and will work on research developments having in mind its uncertainty, complexity and dispersal. Through these studies, the project will also promote a development of cyber knowledge. As its concrete methodology, it will deal with new methods for data analysis which are attracting much attention, such as a machine learning (e.g. an inductive method and neutral network), modeling based on multiple agents, mathematic models of meaning, information flow models providing a basis for communication, etc. Furthermore, as its application area, the project will include so-called pattern recognition through spectral information, multi-media database systems focusing on super high-definition images, agent economics, verbalization of physical intelligence, and the modelization of infants’ language acquisition system. For each of these themes, a detailed study will be performed.

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Applied Environmental Design (Green Architectural Design)

Instructor:
Note: There are two (recommended) prerequisite Subjects for this course
60530: Applied Environmental Design (Architecture and Landscape Design)
60540: Applied Environmental Design (Urban Environment Design)
Students who passed the prerequisite subjects above with excellent grade are qualified to take this studio course for credits. For those who wish to take this class as a non-credited subject, this rule does not apply. Also note this course is time-intensive and is intended for students who can devote sufficient time for research and design on green buildings throughout the semester. Students will also need to have some facility with 2D CAD, 3D CAD, etc. There is no specific requirement as to which software is to be used, however students are requested to bring their own software/hardware.
Content: Lectures, practical trainings, exercises, group works
Contact:
Class Website:

Outline:
The Applied Environmental Design Studio is an advanced spatial design exercise for graduate students who are pursuing architecture, urban design and planning, or landscape architecture as a career. In all studios the programs are grounded in the examination of real environmental issues, and are framed by a multi-disciplinary approach taking full advantage of the knowledge of several professions. Problems are tackled at a variety of scales and from multiple perspectives in order to develop realistic and effective solutions. Instructors come from both academia and private practice, and are experienced with leading real projects on the international stage. Students who take four consecutive studios will become eligible for the non-thesis Master’s degree.

With a focus on green architecture, this studio is an advanced class for students who have already studied spatial and environmental design. Students will undertake a research project and make a design for a given site relating to green architecture and sustainable technology. In order to realistically learn about innovative environmental technology in particular, the studio will concentrate on ‘renovation’ projects and tackle comprehensive design issues for building renewal; including a historical and environmental “reading” exercise for renovation specific architecture, understanding site issues that need to be resolved, and consideration for structural and building service upgrade. In this class, students will learn about the layered complexity of sustainability in architecture, using renovation design as the main tool. They will also learn from various perspectives about advanced and diversified technology connected to specific and future-minded green architecture proposals. Regarding environmental technology, members from the faculty of science and engineering are also planning to participate in the studio.

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Applied Environmental Design (Urban Environment Design)

Instructors: William GALLOWAY, Yasushi IKEDA
Workshop: Lecture
Note : This course is equivalent to “Applied Environmental Design B”. Students, who already completed this subject may audit the class as a non-credited subject
Contact: yasushi (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
Class Website:

Outline:
This is an advanced practical environmental design studio for graduate students who have a significant educational background in the field and who have decided to specialize in architecture, landscape design, urban design and city planning. The course is built around an international and multi-disciplinary perspective and offers broad training in practical problem solving at various scales in the built environment. Students are asked to use design problems as the vehicle for creation of concrete proposals in architectural design, landscape design, urban design, and city planning, and to explore real and contextual issues of the urban environment at an advanced level. A chief goal of the class is for students to come to understand the multi-layered and intertwined structure of the urban environment through the design process, and to develop the tools needed to design persuasive and comprehensive proposals in the urban context. Students who achieve high standing in all four applied environmental design studios will qualify to complete the master's degree though a non-master's thesis course.

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Safety in Environmental Design

Instructor:
Content: Lecture
Contact:

Outline:
In addition to natural and human disasters, there are layers of social and economic risks intertwined in our lives, which put our society in jeopardy. In such circumstances, the term ‘safe environment’ is becoming more and more significant for our society with a wide range of expressions in its meaning.

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Environmental Technology and Space Design

Instructor: Kentaro SUGA
Content: Lecture
Contact:

Outline:
The purpose of this lecture is to provide students with concepts and methodologies to appropriately design building to create a comfortable environment with low impact to the environment. The students will learn about relationship between each technology and its impact to architectural/urban space. The lecture will mainly focus on case studies and group discussion to give better understanding along with slide lecture as a basis of the discussion. The slide lecture will provide an international perspective as well as local practise to give a big picture of each technology, and the actual project example to give practical understanding.

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Architectural Environment Management

Instructor: Susumu HORIKAWA
Content: Lecture
Contact:

Outline:

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Building Technology

Instructors: Hiroto KOBAYASHI
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) - 43130: Building Element Design
Content: Lecture
Contact: hiroto (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
The history of architecture is defined by the history of technology. The so-called Modernist age of architecture and urban planning was only possible because of the advent of new technologies related to steel, glass and concrete construction. New materials and techniques made it possible to build entirely novel buildings and spaces. Since that time technology has evolved continuously, which leads us to ask what is possible with the technologies available to us today?

This class brings together a group of leading structural engineers who are involved in the invention and development of new construction technologies, and uses their expertise to consider the connection between technology and the environment. Students will have the opportunity to visit laboratories and factories where they can study real projects, examine their particular backgrounds, how the technology is used, and the potential for architecture and urban design.

Each student is expected to choose a theme related to architectural technology and conduct research and analysis on the subject. The results of the research will then be presented at mid-term and in a final presentation.

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Building Materials and Construction Technology

Instructors:
Content: Lectures, practical trainings, exercises
Contact:
Class Website:

Outline:
Contemporary architecture is wildly diverse, comprised as it is of a wide range of sizes, shapes and content. The goal of this class is to understand how building components can be put together from various materials, and how architects should decide on material usage according to the needs of construction and maintenance.

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Space Law

Instructors: Setsuko AOKI
Content: Lecture, Workshop, Group Work
Contact: aosets (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
Class Website:

Outline:

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Digital Earth Science

Instructor: Wanglin YAN
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact: yan (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
Class Website:

Outline:
Information technology has digitized modern business and modern lifestyles, making both more convenient. A significant case in point is the advent of Digital Earth, in which a virtual space on the internet was formed around the collection of a massive amount of geospatial data. Meanwhile in the physical world, the Earth is now surrounded by satellites that generate high resolution images of much of the planet below. These are in turn supplemented by mobile and stationary sensors on ground for collecting social and environmental data. Together these sensors give life to the cyber space and add a level of sophistication to information service. In order to take advantage of this cross-cutting technology this course will teach the concepts of Digital Earth as well as the principles of its essential technologies. Students will learn to use Digital Earth as a tool for solving social and natural problem through case studies and exercises. Students are also required to design their own applications with the technology at the end of the course.

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Policy Management (Human Security and International Development)

Instructors: Michio UMEGAKI, Kazunori TANJI
Content: Lecture, Workshop. Remote access to be provided
Contact: umegaki (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
When dealing with "development," be it economic or political or othrwise, the real issue an average citizn faces is how to be "part" of it. And how to be part of it forces him/her a difficult choice of making a right deicsion. In addition to the sense of insecurity attendant upon the ooportunity to make the right decsion, there is inevitable insecurity in calculating what the "right" deicision is. This course, facing these opportunities of insecurity, helps students to develop an analytical framework for the linkages between human (reads anyone's) insecurity and development (reads a transtion from point A to point B)

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Development and the Local Community

Instructor: Lynn THIESMEYER
Prerequisite Course (Recommended) - 32010: International Relations
Prerequisite Course (Recommended) - 31150: Macroeconomics 1
Related Courses - 65010: International Relations
Related Courses - 32070: Regional Development
Content:Lecture
Contact: thiesmey (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
Class Website: http://web.sfc.keio.ac.jp/~thiesmey/kaihatsunote.htm

Outline:
In this class we research and discuss issues of livelihood, environmental resources, health, and migration within the ASEAN countries. We focus on the issues that have arisen with economic development. In addition to reading theoretical works on development, we adopt a regional focus on Asia. Within Asia, we focus mainly on Southeast Asia. There is also a practical and micro-level focus on the people and communities in developing regions who are experiencing development themselves. After the mid-term, we explore various strategies for Sustainable Development and participatory development by looking at some current projects in Asia.

We look at 5 main issues in contemporary development in rural Asia: 1) Unsustainable and Sustainable livelihoods in rural areas 2) Efforts to fulfil Basic Human Needs and Human Security 3) Labor force: gender, migration (both domestic and cross-border), wages 4) Public Health issues and policies 5) Impacts of Climate Change on developing countries and populations.

For a basic grasp of the topics above, students will need to complete a fair amount of reading each week. After reading the assigned materials for each week and participating in the lectures on the reading material, students are expected to participate in questions and discussion. Students should also look at the materials and issues from a multi-faceted point of view. For this purpose they should also research on their own into other relevant primary sources, including books, websites, and current statistical data. Suggestions on these other materials are offered in class.

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Asia Pacific Initiative for Sustainable Development

Instructors:
Content: Lectures
Contact:

Outline:
Making use of a distant leanring system linking 8 overseas and Japanese universities, we will offer the experts' presentations on the following issues.
The three inter-connected issues - climate, energy and food - present immense and daunting challenges for the Asia Pacific region and the world as whole. They are further exacerbated by the fact that Asia Pacific is home to 65% of the global population. This population is growing rapidly and the region is the powerhouse for both global manufacturing and for consumption.
The question we need to address is whether the region’s current development path is sustainable in the long term, particularly with rising food and energy costs and policy-induced carbon constraints? This is the central concern for the students taking this course to consider: What is the optimal future direction of the Asia Pacific region to deal with the interconnected concerns for climate, energy and food security? A total transformation may be required to respond to these challenges, but the questions remain as to how this transformation can be facilitated, what obstacles are we likely to face and how quickly we can move forward? The course offers lectures and encourages student discussion to analyse this question from global, national and local perspectives.

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Advanced Spatial Data Modeling

Instructor: Tomoyuki FURUTANI
Content: Lecture
Contact: maunz (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
Class Website:

Outline:

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Exercise on Designing Low-carbon Society 1

Instructors: Mimi NAMEKI, Naoki MATSUO, Yasuki SHIRAKAWA
Related Classes
64300: Designing a Low-carbon Society
64310: Environmental Technology Systems
64320: Designing Environmental Business
64340: Exercise on Designing Low-carbon Society 2
You are expected to master spreadsheet (Excel) skills before this course.
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact: mnameki (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
This course introduces students to basic skills for the design of policy and projects for a low-carbon economy through workshops focusing on: 1.The actual quantitative estimation of energy consumption and the emission of greenhouse gases from various economical activities (to understand the overall picture, and key parameters). 2.Experimental calculation of baseline absorption and emission of CO2. 3.Experiments using "Syou-Ene Navi", a monitoring equipment for energy efficiency 4.Experimental estimation of the emission reductions by specific measures for low-carbon economy. 5.Planning practice of energy consumption/GHG emission reduction measure/policy

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Designing a Low-carbon Society

Instructors: Hikaru KOBAYASHI, Hironori HAMANAKA, Makoto KATOU, Michie KISHIGAMI, Naoki MATSUO
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) - 42030: Global Environmental Politics
Content:Lecture
Contact: hikaruko (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
You will study fundamental knowledge both in terms of science and policies necessary to understand key issues involved in, and approaches to designing low-carbon societies, including:
1. Scientific understanding of climate change, its impacts, science and policy interface, global greenhouse gas emissions and their future projections based on different socio-economic scenarios.
2. Integration of climate change policies into development in developing countries in Asia,
3. Political processes of building international regime to tackle climate change, current negotiations on post-2012 climate regime and their challenges,
4. Key considerations in designing emissions trading and other important policy instruments,
5. Carbon accounting and carbon management, and
6. Corporate, local and national climate actions.

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Energy and Global Environment

Instructor: Masataka WATANABE
Content: Lecture
Contact: masawata (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
Class Website: http://sustainability.sfc.keio.ac.jp/

Outline:
With global warming issues rising up to the surface, there have been a series of efforts to resolve these problems, such as the reduction of CO2 emission, the promotion of energy-saving policies, and the development of alternative and clean energy. Meanwhile, these energy-related issues are deeply linked to the sustainable growth of the entire earth and the environmental issues. For example, the expansion of regional conflicts and the threat of terrorism are causing some anxiety for a potential lack of energy supply. Also, the rapid increase in energy demands following the economic growth centering on China is causing the boost of energy prices. In order to effectively select and execute environmental policies and their technical options, it is essential to put together a social development scenario which can take effect under the restricted resources. Also, it is crucial to evaluate the effect of environmental loads on the natural environment, and to forecast influences of environmental deterioration on the human society. In this class, the students will learn the shift in the structure of energy demands, as well as the relationship between the development of energy technology for future generations and global environmental issues. At the same time, the class will develop certain subjects as its primary themes, such as how the amount of energy consumption can be restricted within an acceptable range of the environmental capacity, how environmental resources can be sustained while making maximum use of them, and what kind of methodologies can be considered in order to achieve these issues.

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Energy Policy Analysis

Instructor:
Content: Lecture
Contact:

Outline:
While looking back at the energy issues from the past, the class will look at 21st century energy use, and develop a policy theory to realize it.

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Total Design of Private and Public Profits 1

Instructors: Masatoshi TAMAMURA, Akiko KOKUBO, Yoshinori ISAGAI, Hideyuki INOUE, Ikuyo KANEKO, Jiro KOKURYO, Atsushi SHINJO, Ken ITO, Hideyuki YASUI, Takako YAMADA, Kan Hiroshi SUZUKI, Gen MIYAGAKI, Tomohiro ICHINOSE
Prerequisite Course (Recommended) - 65540: Total Design of Private and Public Profits 2
Related Courses - 64280: Design for Social Innovation
Related Courses - 64260: Product Development and Promotion of Social Business
Related Courses - 64270: Social Innovation Through Social Entrepreneurship
Related Courses - 60360: Social Finance
Related Courses - 65260: Social Entrepreneurship
Content: Lecture, Workshop, Group Work. Remote access to be provided
Note: Primarily intended for students in the Social Innovators course
Contact: tama (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
In modern society, the protection and formation of natural/social environment to improve the well being of humankind is becoming a pressing issue. A shift towards a low-carbon society is a realistic and urgent social/political requirement. Meanwhile, it is also imperative to improve the productivity of the overall society and to promote the revitalization of local communities. Under such circumstances, a conventional approach considering “private profits (interests of an individual or a specific organization)” and “public profits” as a contradiction will only lead to a bottleneck. Furthermore, it is not sufficient to separately promote the business approach engaging only in “private profits” and the political approach pursuing only “public profits.” It is now called for to demonstrate the social entrepreneurship, and to promote a “total design of private and public profits,” so that the market mechanism and the methods of business management can be connected to the promotion of public interests. In this class, the students will learn and acquire new skills to create new ways of life and to put them into practice in order to change the society – e.g. how to realize sustainable public interests by starting up a new business for private benefits. Through this kind of examples in a variety of fields such as environment, business and social entrepreneurism, the class will discuss several topics. These are a method to implement a so-called “incentive system” promoting “private profits,” a method to establish a “cooperative work” achieving public profits, and a “system to fairly distribute outcomes of the cooperative work.” Students will create their own projects while studying these examples, and present their results at the end of the semester. The class will be held in combination with lectures, discussions and group works as appropriate.

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Total Design of Private and Public Profits 2

Time: 1st period of every Wednesday
Instructors: Masatoshi TAMAMURA, Akiko KOKUBO, Yoshinori ISAGAI, Hideyuki INOUE, Ikuyo KANEKO, Jiro KOKURYO, Atsushi SHINJO, Ken ITO, Hideyuki YASUI, Takako YAMADA, Kan Hiroshi SUZUKI, Gen MIYAGAKI, Tomohiro ICHINOSE
Prerequisite Course (Recommended) - 64530: Total Design of Private and Public Profits 1
Related Courses - 64280: Design for Social Innovation
Related Courses - 64260: Product Development and Promotion of Social Business
Related Courses - 64270: Social Innovation Through Social Entrepreneurship
Related Courses - 60360: Social Finance
Related Courses - 65260: Social Entrepreneurship
Content: Lecture, Workshop, Group Work. Remote access to be provided
Note: Primarily intended for students in the Social Innovators course
Contact: tama (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
In modern society, the protection and formation of natural/social environment to improve the well being of humankind is becoming a pressing issue. A shift towards a low-carbon society is a realistic and urgent social/political requirement. Meanwhile, it is also imperative to improve the productivity of the overall society and to promote the revitalization of local communities. Under such circumstances, a conventional approach considering “private profits (interests of an individual or a specific organization)” and “public profits” as a contradiction will only lead to a bottleneck. Furthermore, it is not sufficient to separately promote the business approach engaging only in “private profits” and the political approach pursuing only “public profits.” It is now called for to demonstrate the social entrepreneurship, and to promote a “total design of private and public profits,” so that the market mechanism and the methods of business management can be connected to the promotion of public interests. In this class, the students will learn and acquire new skills to create new ways of life and to put them into practice in order to change the society – e.g. how to realize sustainable public interests by starting up a new business for private benefits. Through this kind of examples in a variety of fields such as environment, business and social entrepreneurism, the class will discuss several topics. These are a method to implement a so-called “incentive system” promoting “private profits,” a method to establish a “cooperative work” achieving public profits, and a “system to fairly distribute outcomes of the cooperative work.” Students will create their own projects while studying these examples, and present their results at the end of the semester. The class will be held in combination with lectures, discussions and group works as appropriate.

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Product Development and Promotion of Social Business

Instructors: Toshiaki KOJIMA, Masatoshi TAMAMURA
Note:
Content: Lecture

Outline:

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Social Innovation Through Social Entrepreneurship

Instructors: Kan Hiroshi SUZUKI, Kumi IMAMURA, Ryo YAMAZAKI, Takako YAMADA, Hideyuki INOUE, Ryo IMAMURA
Related Courses - 64530: Total Design of Private and Public Profits 1
Related Courses - 64540: Total Design of Private and Public Profits 2
Related Courses - 60360: Social Finance
Related Courses - 65260: Social Entrepreneurship
Related Courses - 64260: Product Development and Promotion of Social Business
Content: Lectures, workshop, group works. Remote access to be provided
Note: Primarily intended for students in the Social Innovators course
Note: This course wil be held in a satellite classroom in Tokyo. it is intended for those students who are independent-minded and motivated to exploit social entrepreneurism theory which is multidisciplinary. Undergraduate students will require approval from their professors to take this class. The same level of commitment as other graduate students is required from the undergraduate students.
Content: Lecture, Workshop, Group Work. Remote access to be provided
Contact:

Outline:
Why is social entrepreneurship referred to as “social innovation?” In the field of social entrepreneurism, its actual practice has preceded its academic study, and it has not been long since its research started mainly in business schools. This class will analyze the management of social entrepreneurship with some examples, as well as its context of the social innovation. At the same time, the students will be requested to write an essay or prepare a so-called “virtual plan,” based on their own interests, which include a new idea to bring about a new system change in the world.
Specific themes to be addressed in the class are as follows:
1) Using some examples, the students will be familiarized with the movements regarding the present social entrepreneurship/investment, and grasp the description of social entrepreneurism and its overall concept
2) Simultaneously, the class will deal with business management issues (e.g. problem solving model, business model, organizational operation)
3) The students will study what “social innovation” is, which is produced by the social entrepreneurship.
As its particular method, the class will cover a variety of themes, such as a horizontal development (scale out) of successful instances, and a utilization of design/right-brain elements. The main purpose of this method is to realize how a movement incepted from an individual discovery could lead to a change in the social system.
Moreover, the class will be carried out with many discussions and various exercises. The students will produce their own class community, and come up with a style to learn from one another. The class will let the students personally discover a direction and guideline to become social innovators in the future.

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Practice for Local Community Creation

Instructors: Shiuichi KURABAYASHI, Manabu OMAE, Tomohiro ICHINOSE
Content: Lectures, practical trainings, exercises
Contact:

Outline:
This course focuses on the fundamental ICT skills and the fieldwork for local community creation. This course deals with the introduction-level programming techniques in the first half of this lecture. Next, this course deals with the analysis method of environment information by using several sensor devices and smartphones. In order to build a practical fieldwork supporting system in the second half of a lecture, this course introduces data mining and visualization methods. 1) Data Harvesting: learning the method to capture environment information, through sensor devices and smartphones. 2) Data Analysis: studying the data analysis technique for extracting significant information from the collected environment information using database technology. 3) Visualization: studying the information visualization method for user's intuitive understanding. 4) Evaluation: improving the fieldwork supporting system through the evaluation of fieldwork results.

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Conceptual Framework (EG1)

Instructors: Wangling YAN, Kazunori TANJI
Note : This course is equivalent to "Conceptual Framework D". Students, who already completed this subject may audit the class as a non-credited subject.
Content: Lectures
Note : Either this course or "Conceptual Framework (EG2)" is compulsory for EI students.
Contact: yan (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
Contemporary societies around the world face a broad spectrum of problems, many of them contradictory. Populations are declining in one area, but growing exponentially in another; cities are shrinking in one part of the world, while sprawling slums continue their expansion elsewhere. On top of this the need to adapt and mitigate against the effects of climate change demand particular solutions. Though these issues might seem to be opposites, it is important to recognize that they are not discrete phenomena that can be set against each other. In fact when combined they form a kind of opportunity for creating a new paradigm of human development. Taking on climate change issues from this perspective the course teaches the fundamental science of mitigating and adapting to climate change with the intent that students will be able to give shape to inter-disciplinary research projects of their own. We are going to extract patterns of policy and actions by reviewing cases and applications of climate change mitigation and adaptation around the world. Through this process students will develop a fundamental knowledge of climate change, as well as learn the essential skills of literature review, identifying research objectives, and writing research proposals.

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Advanced Research (EG1)

Instructors: Yasushi IKEDA, Hikaru KOBAYASHI
Content: Lecture
Contact: yasushi (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
This advanced research class aim to provide an overall and concrete vision of innovation required for sustainable design of the urban environment, lifestyles and social systems (Green Innovation) especially in Japanese industrial and economical attempt in global perspective. ICT is regarded as an essential common foundation for all these innovative technologies. The class is composed of practical examples of innovation introduced by guest lecturers who are tackling the development and application of such ideas, through the creation of new values or cultivation of demand. Based on the effort of students, the following technologies will be investigated:
1 Technologies for reduction of energy consumption in city and society.
2 Technology to promote natural renewables and natural resource recycling
3 Technology to adopt future environmental changes in consideration of conservation of global ecological systems

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Advanced research (EG2)

Instructors: Tomohiro ICHINOSE, William GALLOWAY, Takafumi MIYASAKA
Content: Lecture, group work
Contact:

Outline:
The structure of a university does not normally bring students from other fields together, even if we do all share the same goals. As a way to bring students closer to each other we started the EI seminar in 2012 to discuss ways to collaborate around the topic of climate change. This course builds on that experience and expands the topic to include large scale change of all kinds, including economic change, dramatic population change, and recovering from disaster.

The course looks further to the challenge of scaling actions taken at the local scale in order to have significant impact on large scale problems. The role of scientific research, of design, and collaboration between disciplines is the focus of attention. Examples are offered from the real world and a theoretical background is introduced to explain and support the course. Students from all disciplines are encouraged to join the class. They will be asked to practice what they learn through a collaborative project that will be presented at the end of the semester.

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Advanced research (Development and Social Theories)

Instructors: Lynn Thiesmeyer
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact: thiesmey (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
This is a graduate-level course taught in English. The focus of the course is on the theory and practice of fieldwork in developing countries, and the objective is to enable graduate students to do Master's-level fieldwork. Overview and Background of the Course: To learn to do appropriate fieldwork, analyze it, and incorporate it into a thesis.

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Ecological and Environmental Fieldwork

Instructors: Tomoko DOKO
Content: Lectures, Practical training, exercises, group works
Contact: dokochan (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
Class website:

Outline:
In this class, students will get hands-on exercises on fieldwork skills in the fields of natural science and social science regarding environment. The objective of this class is to learn the skills and techniques which can approach local and regional problems from diversified standpoints. Specifically the detailed fieldwork contents are as follows: to read topographic maps, to detect and interpret aerial photos, to survey land-use, to survey topography, to study Biota, to investigate history and culture, to analyze landscape, to conduct hearings or interviews, and so on. In the class, we set up a concrete study area, visit actual place to prior, learn respective field survey skills, and finally conduct fieldwork on site. The class will be done mainly based on group work. The lecturer will give an explanation on a variety of field survey methods; however, the lecture will be carried on through group discussions to build survey in order to solve the local and regional issues which students figure out by themselves. Thus students who will register this course are expected to think by themselves, and to be involved to the active group discussion to form the fieldwork positively and actively.

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Internship A/B (EG)

Instructor: Tomohiro ICHINOSE
Content:
Contact:

Outline:
The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities with students to collect beneficial data or results through internship within or outside of Japan that is related to student’s research theme. Students are required to submit a "Research/Internship Plan" before their internship begins. The application deadline is in mid January or early July. Students’ plans are reviewed and only students who received an approval on their plans will be allowed to register this course in the following semester. Detail information about application procedure and duration of internship will be announced on the bulletin board in Tau building. Internship should be conducted during spring or summer break. Students must select a faculty member as an advisor for their Internship. Students are expected to receive advice from their advisors for the duration of three hours or more in advance. The actual duration of Internship should be approximately seventy hours or more or it can also be 10 days at least. In principle, students’ advisors should be involved in a project/activity/events/work that students will participate in as their internship. Students cannot participate in an internship program which is not related to their research themes. Detail information about assignment will be announced on the bulletin board after course registration. Please check the bulletin board in Tau building frequently.

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Applied Environmental Design (Synthesis)

Instructors: Yasushi IKEDA, Hiroto KOBAYASHI, Naoto NAKAJIMA
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 64500: Applied Environmental Design (Green Architectural Design)
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 60540: Applied Environmental Design (Urban Environment Design)
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 60530: Applied Environmental Design (Architecture and Landscape Design)
Content:
Contact: yasushi (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
This is an advanced practical environmental design studio for graduate students who have a significant educational background in the field and who have decided to specialize in architecture, landscape design, urban design and city planning. The course is built around an international and multi-disciplinary perspective and offers broad training in practical problem solving at various scales in the built environment.

Students are asked to use design problems as the vehicle for creation of concrete proposals in architectural design, landscape design, urban design, and city planning, and to explore real and contextual issues of the urban environment at an advanced level.

A chief goal of the class is for students to come to understand the multi-layered and intertwined structure of the urban environment through the design process, and to develop the tools needed to design persuasive and comprehensive proposals in the urban context. Students who achieve high standing in all four applied environmental design studios will qualify to complete the master's degree though a non-master's thesis course.

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Applied Environmental Design (Architecture and Landscape Design)

Instructors: Hiroto KOBAYASHI, William GALLOWAY, Kazuyo SEJIMA
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 60620: Urban Design Studies
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 60610: Structural Design
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 12220: Design Language Workshop (Architecture and Urbanism)
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 12150: Design studio (housing and environment)
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 12160: Design studio (architecture and urbanism)
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 12170: Design studio (landscape and architecture)
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 03200: Designing Space
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 33030: Urban Space Design with Information Technology
Related Class: 60540: Applied Environmental Design (Urban Environment Design)
Related Class: 12230: Design Language Workshop (Space Design)
Note : This course is equivalent to “Applied Environmental Design A”. Students, who already completed this subject may audit the class as a non-credited subject.
Content:
Contact: hiroto (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
Environmental design, as a profession, has taken on a global significance. Design needs to be considered with an international point of view. This year we have the opportunity to learn from an architect who embodies that point of view exactly. Ms. Kazuyo Sejima, the Pritzker prize winning Japanese architect, will lead the studio this year.

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History of City and Living Environment

Instructors: Naoto NAKAJIMA
Content: Lecture, Group work
Contact: naoto (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
The objective of this lecture is to acquire the broad knowledge about the historical change of built environment around architecture. Main interest is how traditional built environments in Japanese, Asian, European and Islamic cities have changed through modernization and post modernization. We will discuss about colonial cities in America and Asia too from the view of early globalization. At last, possibilities and problematic of cities and architecture as cultural heritages will be shown, on the basis of students' surveys on historical changes of built environment of actual cites.

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Urban Design Studies

Instructors: Naoto NAKAJIMA
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact: naoto (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
In this lecture, we will discuss about historical change of urban formation, ideas and methods of urban design, problems and solutions of urban design in practice, and ideas of design and planning codes, from the view point of comprehensive approach of planning and design for urban spaces. Through the fieldworks and the case studies on various practices, the role of urban designer, architect, landscape architect and planner in urban design projects and strategy will be made known.

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Landscape Design

Instructors: Yoshiki MISHIMA
Content: Lectures
Contact:

Outline:
This class provides the basic concepts of environmental design that are necessary for students who will be professionals in the fields of landscape, architecture, urban design, and planning. It is organized into three sections. The first section uses concrete examples to look at the Past, Present, and Future of Landscape design, covering design methodologies and philosophies, and including traditional (Japanese) gardens. The second section focuses on site analysis and plant materials, and is conducted in view of the natural environment as it relates to architecture using the Shonan Fujisawa Campus as a case study. In this section trees and plants are studied intensively. The third section consists of a design exercise designed to examine basic planning and design methods with a concrete site.

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Advanced Research (Development and Social Theories)

Instructors: Lynn THIESMEYER
Note : This course is equivalent to "Advanced Research F". Students, who already completed this subject may audit the class as a non-credited subject.
Content: Lectures, practical trainings, exercises
Contact: thiesmey (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
This is a graduate-level course taught in English. The focus of the course is on the theory and practice of fieldwork in developing countries, and the objective is to enable graduate students to do Master's-level fieldwork. Overview and Background of the Course To do appropriate fieldwork, analyze it, and incorporate it into a thesis, students should consider the following: How are we to survey and understand the impacts that modernization and development programs undertaken by developed countries have produced on developing countries? We know that first-world development planning has brought benefits and also left problems in its wake. At present, the United Nations, the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (the World Bank), the IMF, and national governments are emphasizing "participatory development” and “sustainable development." To be implemented, however, participatory and sustainable development must be based on accurate knowledge of the everyday lives, needs and skills of the local people, to be derived from localized surveys, action, fieldwork, and analysis. As a background to this knowledge we need, *First, a thorough understanding of the regional, national and local circumstances of the communities to be surveyed. Understanding the social and institutional frameworks within which people experience their needs and implement their own skills is the basis for surveys. *Second, we need 'theoretical literacy', the familiarity with the major scholarly and critical works of a conceptual nature on the subjects of social and economic change and development. *Third, we need the practical skills to undertake and analyze qualitative research, including questionnaires, ethnographic interviews, and group discussions at field sites. To collect and understand qualitative research we learn skills in research design and how to minimize the biases of the researcher as well as the individual subjectivity of the respondents. *Finally, we need to discuss ways to combine the 3 aspects above with each other through regression and correspondence, in order to produce convincing findings for a thesis and for policy recommendations.

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International Environmental Law

Instructors: Setsuko Aoki
Content: Lectures
Note: This course has a maximum enrollment of approximately 120.
Selection Method and Timing: Screening will be performed at the first class using the screening sheet. It is a requirement that the students have taken the International Law course.
Contact: aosets (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp
It is often assumed that international environmental law is found in the same field as international law. However, as it is newly developed, international environmental law has a different set of characteristics in comparison to conventional international law as it exists today. This class will begin with a general theoretical discussion of how international environmental law differs from conventional international law from the perspective of state responsibility, dispute settlement methods, etc. The class will build on this work with factual research into how international law has been used to address environmental issues in various fields, such as water contamination (rivers, oceans), air pollution (ozone depletion), global warming, nuclear power damage, biodiversity security, cross-border infectious diseases, environmental disruption due to wars, space debris, and so on. Based on this research, and in consideration of the varied environmental issues faced in by global society in the 21st century, the class will consider if such issues can be handled by modern international law as it has been modified by implementation of environmental law. The class will also discuss whether it is necessary to introduce a new framework.

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Biodiversity Science

Instructors: Hiroyoshi HIGUCHI
Content: Lectures, workshop, group work
Contact: hhiguchi (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
There are many species of plants and animals around us. If we go abroad, we will be able to see a lot more species. How these plant and animal lives work in nature? How do they evolve through time? How are their lives related to our human life? How can we study these subjects? In this course, you will deepen your knowledge on the meaning, mechanisms, and conservation of biodiversity through lectures and your actual experiences.

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Global Environmental Politics

Instructors: Hikaru Kobayashi
Prerequisite Subject (Recommended) : 40170: Environmental Policies
Content: Lectures
Note: The number of students for this class will be limited to approximately 100
Selection Method and Timing: If the number of students who wish to take this subject exceeds 100 at the time of the first attendance, they will be asked to fill out a screening sheet with their own expectations on future global environmental policies. The text will be evaluated by a faculty member and those who demonstrate sufficient awareness of the problems will be accepted to take the class.
Contact: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Outline:

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Designing Environmental Business

Instructors: Hikaru KOBAYASHI, Mari YOSHITAKA, Naoki MATSUO
Prerequisite Subject: (Recommended)64300: Designing a Low-Carbon Society
Related Class:64310: Environmental Technology Systems
Related Class:64340: Exercise on Designing Low-Carbon Society 2
Related Class:64330: Exercise on Designing Low-Carbon Society 1
Related Class:51007: Advanced Research (EG1)
Content: Lectures
Contact: hikaruko (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
Integrated progress in environmental, economic and social aspects of society is required to shift to low-carbon society as well as sustainable society. Enhancement of the role performed by business sector is essential to achieve this. This subject aims to establish the fundamental viewpoint of businesses acting to build a low-carbon as well as sustainable society and develop eco-business, with particular attention on basic and practical methods used to build eco-business.

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Exercise on Designing Low-Carbon Society 2

Time: 4th and 5th period of every Friday
Instructors: Mimi NAMEKI, Hikaru KOBAYASHI, Hironori HAMANAKA, Kazunori TANJI, Makoto KATOU, Michie KISHIGAMI
Prerequisite Subject: (Recommended)64300: Designing a Low-Carbon Society
Prerequisite Subject: (Recommended)64330: Exercise on Designing Low-Carbon Society 1
Related Class:64310: Environmental Technology Systems
Related Class:64320: Designing Environmental Business
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact:

Outline:
This course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills for policy-makers in the field of climate change, through lectures, workshops, discussions, and hands-on training based on methods developed for the field of Public Administration and Business Administration. Students are expected to develop the ability to integrate climate change measures and low-carbon projects into current sectoral policies and projects in a practical and efficient manner, and to implement them.
More detailed objectives of this course are to:
1. Overview the framework of, and learn the method for, policy design and its management. Students will discuss and analyze a variety of actual climate-change related actions by applying the methodology.
2. Apply methodologies to actual cases and design model low-carbon projects at SFC or within a local community.
3. Visit sites where climate change measures are being implemented, with a view to obtaining knowledge on the ground.

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Environmental Technology Systems

Instructors: Mimi NAMEKI, Makoto KATOU, Naoki MATSUO
Prerequisite Subject: (Recommended)64300: Designing a Low-Carbon Society
Prerequisite Subject: (Recommended)64330: Exercise on Designing Low-Carbon Society 1
Related Class:64320: Designing Environmental Business
Related Class:64340: Exercise on Designing Low-Carbon Society 2
Content: Lectures
Contact:

Outline:
Recent trends in environmental technology involve a shift from decontamination at “the end of the pipe” to the next-generation “clean production technology”, which is achieved through innovation in industrial processes. This course introduces students to:
1. The current status and issues within carbon intensive economies and related industrial systems.
2. The methods and technologies for creating a low-carbon economy, including their effects, costs, and challenges to effective technology transfer.
3. Economic growth, co-benefits, governmental policies, and incentive measures to develop new technologies for a low-carbon society.

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Theory of Global Environment Technology

Instructors: Hikaru KOBAYASHI, Yasushi IKEDA, Tomohiro ICHINOSE, Keisuke UEHARA, Wanglin YAN, Satoko OKI, Mimi NAMEKI, Hitomi SANO, Kazunori TANJI, Hiroyoshi HIGUCHI, Tomoko DOKO
Content: Lectures
Contact: hikaruko (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:

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Advanced Research (Casebook Methods in Research and Education)

Instructors: Emiko BAN
Content: Lecture, Workshop, Group Work
Contact:

Outline:

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Social Finance

Instructors: Ken ITO, Hideyuki INOUE
Content: Lecture, Group Work
Contact: itok (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:

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Design for Social Innovation

Instructors: Atsushi SHINJO
Content: Lecture, Workshop, Group Work
Contact: kaminari (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:

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Management of Emerging Businesses

Instructors: Jiro KOKURYO, Masaki UMEJIMA
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contacts: jkokuryo (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
This course aims at providing students with basic understanding of technological entrepreneurship, knowledge of business modeling and essential skills to be a startup. Firstly, this course emphasizes on technological entrepreneurship, which considers the conversion of technology to commercialization. Secondly, many guest speakers with rich entrepreneurial experiences will be invited to share successful experiences. Last year, Mr. Chihito Kusabiraki, CEO, Weather News Inc, and Mr. Eric Gan, Representative Director, President, eAccess, were invited to this class. Thirdly, action learning opportunities such that you write up a business plan are prepared for students. In this course, final assignment is to submitting your business plan. Apart from doing this work, this business plan assignment can also be used as submission for the SOI Asia Business Plan Contest, hosted by SOI Asia, Asian wide university alliance. On a voluntary basis, you will be given opportunities to present your business plan directly to the venture capitalist and industry. Goals of this course are: 1) Foster entrepreneurial mindset, 2) Understand necessary factors for business planning, and 3) Learn know-how to be successful startup.
※Information1: This course uses English for communication. ※Information2: The guest speaker’s lecture might be changed based on their availability schedule. Please refer to the announcement made during the lecture. ※Information3: Some lectures are shared by Asian universities in Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, and Indonesia, via the satellite connection operated by SOI Asia.

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Special Seminar on Environmental Design 1,2

Instructor: Yasushi IKEDA, Hiroto KOBAYASHI
Content: Lecture
Contact: hiroto (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
This subject deepens understanding concerning the realistic problem and how to advance it through the participation experience to the business related to the environmental design in the world. Following guidance of cordinating teacher, student must be involved in real practice of the business of architectural design, the city design, and the landscape design in outside the school, Report of Self-evaluation and the analysis of the work must be done together. After graduate school period, this subjects can taken as required business practice (internship) for the first class authorized architect examination qualification in the future.

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Environmental Design Field Workshop


Instructors:
Note :
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact:

Outline:

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Design of Urban Space

Instructors: Atsushi YANAGISAWA
Content: Lectures
Contact: cmachi (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:

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Urban Policy

Instructors: Moriyuki OE
Content: Lecture
Contact:

Outline:

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Conceptual Framework (Human Security)

Instructors: Michio UMEGAKI
Content: Lecture, Workshop, Group Work
Contact: umegaki (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:
Politics, society, economy or culture, everything we do or we live by is in transition. Nonetheless, we rarely examine, "analytically," 1) what constitutes a transition, 2) what it does to the individuals, communities or even nations, and much less 3) how the individuals or larger communities deal with it. The purpose of the seminar is to fill these void. We examine, through Marx to Parsons, Geerts to Robinson, the major analytical examinations of the transition. We also examine the students preparedness for embarking upon their own research WITH a better perspective of men in transition. We do this by allocating a section for Research Design, where the main role player is the students.

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Strategic Management

Instructors:
Content:
Contact:

Outline:

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Management and Governance of Government Institutions

Instructors:
Content:
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Community Informatics

Instructors: Yoshinori ISAGAI
Content: Lecture, workshop
Contact:

Outline:

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Family Business Management

Instructors: Yoshinori ISAGAI
Content: Lecture
Contact: isagai (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline:

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Environmental Technoscience and Policy

Instructors: Tomohiro ICHINOSE, Naoto NAKAJIMA, Yusaku OKADA, Tetsuya SUZUKI, Darko RADOVIC
Content: Lecture, Workshop, Group Work. Remote access to be provided
Contact: tomohiro (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline: This course is intended to convey investigative analysis methods pertaining to environmental technoscience and environmental policy. Environmental issues are vast and span the natural and social sciences fields. In this course, students gain the ability to approach interdisciplinary subjects while dealing with practical environmental issues. The key significance of this study lies not in acquiring individual techniques or methods as much as in reaching the final objective―gaining a comprehensive ability to resolve environmental problems by gaining a comprehensive understanding of an issue, knowing how to create a framework while under time and resource constraints, and understanding which issues must be dealt with first. It is fundamentally impossible for a specialist to tackle a complex environmental problem on his or her own. It is necessary to meet challenges through collaboration with a variety of specialists and stakeholders. This course aims to nurture environmental leaders, who must be able to understand the core and scope of the problems and understand the output provided by specialists. They must manage their teams comprehensively in order to execute practical measures to resolve problems. Students gain an understanding of the relevant methods in this course and develop comprehensive abilities by taking on projects as a form of practical training.

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Large-Scale Environmental Systems

Instructors: Wanglin YAN, Kohei Matsunaga, Shinnosuke Obi, Akiyoshi Hatayama, Koichi Hishida, Kenji Yasuoka, Koji Fukagata
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact: yan (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline: This course gives an overview of the present status and future perspectives of global environment, resources, and energy problems. To obtain simultaneous solution for both environment and energy problems, we will consider and propose what is the optimum energy mix in the future. The overall aspects, i.e., technical consistency/feasibility and social acceptability/policy making will be discussed by all of the participants in this course. To study technical aspects intensively, we will conduct 6 weeks exercise under close contact with advisory members of this course.

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Environmental Information System Architecture

Instructors: Yasushi Kiyoki, Hideyuki Tokuda, Shuichi Kurabayashi, Kenji Yasuoka, Koji Fukagata
Content: Lecture, Workshop. Remote access to be provided
Contact: kiyoki (@) sfc.keio.ac.jp

Outline: In this course, the student will learn a method for building several environmental information systems. This course focuses on a new area that combines the environmental field and the information technology field, which have been evolving independently. By acquiring large-scale environmental data from the “real environmental space” and by measuring the cause and effect of changes in the “environmental information space” with regard to people flow data, large-scale image data, and natural environment data, students will learn a method for designing and building an environmental information system. This system will equip them with (1) the ability to respond to medium- and long-term environmental changes by detecting changes that are taking place gradually during normal times, and (2) the capability to respond quickly to changes that occur due to sudden disruptions of the environment in an emergency. In recent years, with the development of sensors and faster storage devices with larger capacities, resized environmental data are being handled much more frequently than before. As a result, large-scale data processing technology has become essential for the understanding and scientific analysis of environmental data. In this course, the student will learn the construction of an environmental measurement, analysis, and information delivery system using ICT technology. Then, having acquired the capability to analyze actual environmental data, students will develop a scientific perspective that will enable them to consider both environmental data and constructive approaches to solutions. In particular, using hardware technologies that target the monitoring and control of the real environmental space, students will learn about environmental database systems, ubiquitous environment systems, and environmental video data processing. This study will include the technology for the control of sensors in the real environment, and an ICT technique to measure the cause and effect of environmental changes that occur in the environmental information space. The students will also learn about environmental modeling based on the results obtained from the information space. They will study the solving to ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations, which are fundamental to modeling, and will perform modeling exercises using GPGPU and multi-core parallel computing.

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Global Environmental Policy Management

Instructors: Hikaru Kobayashi, Shiori Sasaki, Kanako Morita, Toshihisa Ueda, Osamu Kurita
Content: Lecture, Workshop. Remote access to be provided
Contact:

Outline: This course aims to provide students with foundational knowledge and techniques to engage in the formulation and implementation of international environmental policy.
This class will enable students to acquire literacy in international environmental policy, which is indispensable for future work in international institutions and organizations in the environmental field. With a view to solving environmental problems that are emerging in various parts of the world, the class will cultivate students’ knowledge using typical and representative examples related to basic points such as “why must we resort to international systems?” and “through what means and methods can the international society support the resolution of specific problems?” At the same time, the class will provide students with basic environmental management tools for handling the environment on a macroscale that they can understand as international environmental policy professionals.
Finally, simulations of international environmental policy negotiations will be conducted so that students can understand the basics, grasp the mechanics of multilateral environmental negotiations, and cultivate practical communication and negotiation skills. Furthermore, an experiential practicum with environmental measurement technology will also be conducted to help students develop a fundamental technological skill set that can be used to formulate and implement data-driven environmental policies.

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Spatial Analysis

Instructors: Wanglin YAN, Ryota HAMAMOTO, Takafumi MIYASAKA, Tomoyuki FURUTANI
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact:

Outline:

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Policy Management (Policy Making and Social Innovation)

Instructors: Koji MATSUI
Content: Lecture, Workshop
Contact:

Outline:

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